James Kelley, DO, Texas Center for Urology

Urologist

 

About the Expert

Dr. James Kelley is a board certified urologist and urological surgeon at the Texas Center for Urology. Born and raised in DFW, Dr. Kelley received his biology degree from University of North Texas and medical degree from the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth. He completed an internship and residency training in urological surgery at the Charleston Area Medical Center where he served as chief resident. Dr. Kelley lives in Mansfield, Texas with his wife and two daughters.


Q&A

 

What kind of problems does a urologist address?

Urologists are surgeons who complete a five-to-six-year residency after medical school. They treat diseases of the urinary system in men, women, and children, as well as any condition related to the male reproductive system. Common problems urologists treat include kidney stones, cancers of the urinary system, bladder issues, urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, male infertility, prostate problems, vasectomy, hormonal disorders, and urinary tract infections. 

When should I see a urologist?

There are many reasons to seek care from a urologist. Do you feel like you urinate too often, or not often enough? Have you ever seen or been told you had blood in your urine? Do you ever leak urine on accident? Are you waking at night to urinate? Do you suspect you may have a kidney stone? Do you or your partner have issues with sex drive or erections? These are all common questions and concerns urologists can provide answers for.

How many daily trips to the bathroom is normal?

Most people urinate six to seven times per day. Although that “normal” can vary from person to person, if how frequently you urinate is bothersome to you, it’s considered a problem. Urinating frequently can also be an early sign to underlying issues, such as overactive bladder, urinary tract infections, kidney stones, enlarged prostate, or a more concerning problem such as bladder cancer. If you feel you’re rushing to the bathroom throughout the day or night, if you have to know where the nearest bathrooms are at every store you visit, or if your bladder is limiting your daily life, it might be time to schedule a visit with a urologist. 

I sometimes can’t make it to the bathroom in time, or have an accident when I cough or sneeze. Is this just a consequence of getting older?

Leakage of urine, or urinary incontinence, is not simply “part of getting older,” and can cause significant stress. Whether you leak before you can make it to the bathroom or you leak with coughing, sneezing, or exercising, it’s usually due to a treatable issue a urologist can address. Urinary incontinence can affect both women and men but urologists specialize in helping get these symptoms under control.

I think we’re done having kids. What does a vasectomy entail?

A vasectomy is much less complex, with fewer complications, and less expense than female sterilization (getting tubes tied) making it a great option for those considering a more permanent option for pregnancy prevention. Most urologists perform vasectomies in-office or at outpatient surgery centers where you can go home the same day. Most men do well after the surgery, usually requiring only over-the-counter medications for pain. Recovery is typically one to two weeks, with most men back to normal activity, seven to ten days after the procedure. If you’re contemplating a vasectomy, I’d encourage you to schedule a consultation with a urologist to get more information and have all of your questions answered. 


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