Cameron Culver, MD, MPH, Mindful Health

Psychiatrist

About the Expert

Dr. Cameron Culver is double board-certified in general psychiatry and geriatric psychiatry. He completed his undergraduate degree at Baylor University and his master’s degree at Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. He went on to earn a medical degree and Master of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. 


Q&A

 

What are the services offered by Mindful Health?

Mindful Health offers individual, couples, and family therapy via telehealth with experienced, licensed clinicians. Group therapy is provided face to face in our brick-and-mortar clinics. Our providers specialize in mental health care and are committed to your overall health and well-being. 

Internal medicine physician visits are incorporated with group therapy in certain cases, and with permission, we can collaborate with clients’ primary care provider to work as a team to ensure they are receiving comprehensive care for both mind and body.

Why is mental health care so important?

Mental health and physical health are as arbitrarily separate as physical health and preventive health. That is, you can’t have one without the other. Cardiac health is not just for people with bad hearts, and similarly, mental health is not just for people with mental illness. The brain, the mind, and the body are all connected despite our best attempts at separating them, and one cannot be affected without affecting the others.

What is one way the average person could benefit from mental health care?

One example is stress. We are all affected by stress, and not just in the emotional sense. Stress releases hormones and chemicals in response to perceived threat. Those hormones and chemicals are useful in a fight-or-flight situation, but if we don’t know how to come back down once the “fight” is over, or we have a warped perception of what even constitutes a threat, our physical bodies will begin to suffer the effects over time. Everyone can benefit by having a greater understanding of the architecture of the mind and learning how their brain functions. 

What are common reservations that keep people from seeking care?

There is, unfortunately, a stigma when it comes to illnesses of the mind. Therefore, “mental health” can have a negative connotation. You can sum it up by saying that people really don’t want to be perceived as “crazy,” which is not the case. The reality, rather, is that the brain is simply a tool. And sometimes it is impaired because of misuse or “rust,” and our goal is to help restore its functionality through an analysis of the whole person and the context of their lifestyle. 

What sets Mindful Health apart from others in the industry?

Prevention and maintenance, as opposed to intervention alone, is near and dear to my heart, and we understand at Mindful Health that prevention and maintenance requires a fuller picture of the person and not just a snapshot of the problem. We take into consideration the roots that contribute to ill health. We are empowered to offer treatments to improve the immediate signs and symptoms of a problem and its prevention.  

We aim beyond limitations often imposed by narrow consideration of an individual’s diagnosis alone. We aim to understand our clients’ needs through their own eyes, experiences, and expressions of pain, thereby empowering each other toward our best life, mindfully. 


Living Magazine - Ask the Expert

 

 

 

 

Mindful.Health
(972) 346-1885