Anna Baker, LMT, MMD, MI, CDT, Rockwall Medical Massage

Massage Therapist

About the Expert

Anna Baker graduated from Massage Resources in Dallas and started Rockwall Medical Massage to work collaboratively with Rockwall’s medical community to maximize her clients’ health and well-being. She has studied many modalities, including medical, orthopedic, prenatal, and sports massage. Anna is certified in the Chikly method of lymphatic drainage therapy, ACE massage cupping, MediCupping and in treating all stages of lymphedema.


Q&A

 

What should I expect during my first massage therapy visit?

On your first visit, your massage therapist may ask you to complete a health history form. The therapist will then ask you general questions to learn what areas you would like worked on and if you need any conditions addressed. This helps your massage therapist determine which massage is best for you. 

Be sure to list all health concerns and medications so the therapist can adapt the session to your specific needs without doing any harm. It is also important to list any allergies so the therapist can use a different oil or lotion during the session, if necessary.

What should I wear to the visit — and do I fully undress for the massage?

You should undress to the level you are comfortable with. For a full-body massage, most get completely undressed. However, you can keep your underwear on if you are more comfortable that way. If removing all your clothes makes you too nervous and unable to relax, then you are not getting the optimal benefit from the session. Your massage therapist will give you privacy to undress and get comfortable on the table. 

How long does a massage treatment last?

Most full-body massage treatments last about one hour. A half-hour appointment only allows time for a partial massage session, such as neck and shoulders, back or legs, and feet. Many people prefer a session that lasts 60 to 90 minutes for optimal relaxation. Always allow relaxation time prior to and after the session.

Will the massage hurt?

This depends on the type of massage and the depth of the strokes. A light, relaxing massage that doesn’t probe very deep into the muscles shouldn’t hurt. However, there’s a difference between a hurt that feels good and an “ouch, stop it” hurt. Even an intense, deep-tissue massage should stay in the “feels good” hurt range. 

Pain can be an indication that the muscle is possibly injured or inflamed, and pressure should be adjusted. Also, pain can cause you to tighten up and negate the relaxing effects of the massage. The most effective and deepest massage always works with your body’s natural response, not against it.

Is it okay if I fall asleep or prefer not to talk?

Absolutely. This treatment is all about you relaxing and enjoying the experience. Many therapists discourage talking in hopes that you will relax, let your mind float free, and enter a state of massage bliss. However, if you want to talk, go right ahead. Some people feel more relaxed starting off talking, and as the massage progresses they enter quiet states of relaxation. 

If the therapist is doing anything to make you uncomfortable, you should let her or him know immediately. Also, let the therapist know if you get too warm or too cold, if the room is too bright, or if the pressure needs to be changed. If something is not working for you, speak up.


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RockwallMedicalMassage.com
(214) 686-3650